Kirstie Alley blames Las Vegas shooting on psychiatric drugs, sparks outrage on Twitter

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Sunday’s mass shooting in Las Vegas has led many to call for tighter gun control legislation in the U.S., yet actress Kirstie Alley sparked outrage on social media when she placed the blame on doctor-prescribed psychiatric drugs.

“We have to solve the mystery of why there are no ‘shooters’ or almost 0 before the 1980s. I know one common denominator other than guns,” Alley tweeted on Oct. 2. “One additional common denominator of ‘shooters’ is U.S.A.’s mass usage of psychiatric drugs. A % do have side effects of violence and suicide.”

We have to solve the mystery of Why there were no “shooters” or almost 0 before the 1980’s.I know one common denominator other than guns

— Kirstie Alley (@kirstiealley) October 2, 2017

One additional common denominator of “shooters” is USA’s mass usage of psychiatric drugs. A % do have side effects of VIOLENCE & SUICIDE.

— Kirstie Alley (@kirstiealley) October 2, 2017

Alley’s remarks may sound outrageous, especially since there has been no evidence that drugs, psychiatric or otherwise, were involved in the shooting

READ MORE: Jimmy Kimmel’s teary plea for gun control after 59 killed in Las Vegas, his hometown

As an avowed Scientologist, however, Alley’s anti-psychiatry stance is right in line with the teachings of the controversial church’s founder, L. Ron Hubbard, who once wrote, “There is not one institutional psychiatrist alive who, by ordinary criminal law, could not be arraigned and convicted of extortion, mayhem and murder.”

However, Alley’s remarks were too much for TV news reporter Derek Shore, who replied to Alley’s tweet, writing: “Did you really just say that? Sit down. 58 people are dead.”

Did you really just say that? Sit down. 58 people are dead.

— Derek Shore (@DerekShore) October 2, 2017

“Yes I did say it,” Alley fired back. “It happens to be a common denominator in shooters..one that didn’t exist before the 80’s.. not my opinion. Statistic based”

Yes I did say it. It happens to be a common denominator in shooters..one that didn’t exist before the 80’s.. not my opinion. Statistic based https://t.co/M7zopL4Dwl

— Kirstie Alley (@kirstiealley) October 2, 2017

That was when the floodgates opened, with numerous Twitter users criticizing the former Cheers star for her comments.

Use of psych meds has increased in Australia, yet NO mass shootings in last 20 yrs & suicides by gun have dropped 57%. Know why? BANNED GUNS

— Candy Kirby (@candykirby) October 3, 2017

Charles Whitman committed mass shootings in Texas, 1966. At University of Texas. On no psych meds.

— Mary Loza (@hoosierrnmary) October 2, 2017

Are you really using your Scientology BS during a mass shooting 🤔

— Michele Thorpe (@mmt1960) October 2, 2017

Oy, enough of the Scientology alternative facts. No one even knows what meds this guy was/was not on at this point. Seriously, get a grip!

— Evil Tequila Twin (@EvilTequilaTwin) October 3, 2017

Then you can deal with them and take them away from the evil psychiatrists. Just do everyone a favor and shut up.

— Vass (@Vass2016) October 2, 2017

Meds are to PREVENT violent behavior. A cultist in need of psychiatry does not make one an expert. Scientology has nothing to do w/science.

— Dan Della Flora (@Haktoff) October 3, 2017

pic.twitter.com/kBmpPBgSO0

— DianaandCharles (@dianacopley) October 2, 2017

Following the backlash, the 66-year-old actress issued another tweet insisting she has “UTMOST sympathy 4 the victims & their loved ones,” but defended her words by stating that “prayers & condolences aren’t enough anymore.”

UTMOST sympathy 4 the victims & their loved ones. The convo is NOT had & solutions R not found. Prayers & condolences aren’t enough anymore. https://t.co/3JRFRQq3SR

— Kirstie Alley (@kirstiealley) October 2, 2017

This isn’t the first time a celebrity Scientologist’s views on psychiatry stoked controversy. Back in 2005, Alley’s fellow Scientologist Tom Cruise became gave a now-infamous interview with Today host Matt Lauer in which he slammed Brooke Shields for using prescription medication to help overcome postpartum depression, calling psychiatry “a pseudo-science” and recommended vitamins as a cure for postpartum depression.

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